Friday, November 25, 2016

Death in the Shadows


McCusker, Paul. Death in the Shadows. Oxford: Lion Fiction, 2016.

Father Gilbert is attending a church conference. He becomes involved in an investigation led by his friend and former law enforcement colleague Detective Inspector Gwynn. A prostitute was murdered, and one of the suspects is a fellow clergyman. The area is saturated with "spas" offering under the table services. I was uncomfortable reading this book. Lion Fiction has published some of the better written Christian fiction. However, I do not think many Christian readers will be comfortable reading about sexual slavery. I think even fewer of them want a sleuthing priest to make a call requesting services even if he is only investigating and does not engage the young woman for her services. The book is well-written, but it is far outside my comfort zone. I considered abandoning it. This review is based on an advance readers copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.


Thursday, November 03, 2016

Remarriage after Divorce Was Not an Option

I've been studying many of Mississippi's laws that affect our research as genealogists. Sargent's Code, the earliest collection of laws dating back to 1799 in the Territorial Period of the state's history is not freely available online. However, an 1807 version of The Statues of the Mississippi Territory is available at Google Books.

In today's culture and society, remarriage after a divorce is pretty commonplace, but in the early days of Mississippi's existence, it was not permitted. Chapter 13, section 4 of this code reads:

And be it further enacted, That divorces from the bond of matrimony shall also be decreed, where either of the parties had another wife or husband, living at the time of such second or other marriages : and that all marriages, where either of the parties shall have a former wife or husband living, at the time of such marriage, shall be invalid from the beginning, and absolutely void.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Upstream



Oliver, Mary. Upstream: Selected Essays. New York: Penguin Books, 2016.

When I first saw this book, its subtitle was "essays and poems." When I received the book, its subtitle was "selected essays." I love Mary Oliver's poetry so I was curious about her writing in the essay format; however, I really was not that thrilled about the book having very little poetry of hers with a couple of exceptions, introducing the book and perhaps one section. I was, however, pleasantly surprised that many of her essays were almost poetic because of the way she described things. In one section she reflects on the writings of other poets, and parts of their poems are included. I found all of the essays readable, but a few did not quite live up to the poetic characteristic of others. Still, all in all, it is a good collection, even if I was disappointed Oliver's own poetry was not really present. This review is based on an advance review copy received by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Hag-Seed



Atwood, Margaret. Hag-Seed. (Hogarth Shakespeare) New York: Hogarth Shakespeare, Crown Publishing, 2016.

Margaret Atwood did a remarkable job re-imagining Shakespeare's The Tempest. Since his release as artistic director of the Makeshiweg Festival, Felix Phillips has been going by the name Mr. Duke and teaching theatre to a group of prisoners at a medium security institution. He calls his group the Fletcher Correctional Players. The class is more than simply theatre, but he uses theatre as a means to teach other material and critical thinking to the inmates. When the person who had him ousted is set to visit the facility in his official governmental role, Felix sees his opportunity for revenge. He decides to perform The Tempest. He chooses the role of Prospero for himself, gets the woman who was to play Miranda before he was ousted to portray her in this version, and assigns the inmates their roles.  This work is certain to please Shakespeare enthusiasts as well as those who love Atwood's writing. I received an electronic copy for review purposes from the publisher through NetGalley.

Tuesday, October 04, 2016

Holy Shakespeare!



Sparks, Maisie. Holy Shakespeare!: 101 Scriptures that Appear in Shakespeare's Plays, Poems, and Sonnets. New York: Faith Words, 2016.

I was looking forward to this book, thinking perhaps the author was using the Scriptures and passages of Shakespeare to create devotional thoughts. I was disappointed when I opened the book to find only the passage from Shakespeare at the top and the Scripture at the bottom with a few pages of short "facts" about Shakespeare or his times scattered in between. This is definitely a marginal purchase for most persons and libraries as other books treat the subject better from both an academic and devotional point of view. The bibliography at the end of the book is probably the most useful aspect of the entire volume. This review is based on an advance uncorrected proof e-galley provided by the publisher for review purposes through NetGalley.

Napoleon's Last Island



Keneally, Tom. Napoleon's Last Island. New York: Atria, 2016.

Abandoned read. Napoleon was exiled to the island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic in 1815. His residence was not fully renovated so he spent time near the Balcombe family home. Betsy Balcombe, in particular, became a friend of Napoleon for the remainder of their lives. Keneally's well-researched novel focuses on the strange relationship between the two. What the novelist failed to do was create anything that engaged me as a reader. I made it approximately one third of the way into the book before deciding to quit reading it. Other persons may find the book more engaging than I did, particularly if they have a strong interest in Napoleon or enjoyed other books by the author. This review is based on an advance reader's e-galley provided by the publisher through Edelweiss for review purposes.

Saturday, October 01, 2016

Crossing the Waters



Fields, Leslie Leyland. Crossing the Waters: Following Jesus Through the Storms, the Fish, the Doubt, and the Seas. Colorado Springs: NavPress, 2016.


Fields, the author of this volume, resides in Kodiak, Alaska, where she works with her family in the commercial fishing industry. This book relates stories from her own experience. She also travels to Israel where she visits the waters Jesus himself frequented -- the Sea of Galilee and Jordan River. I found the narrative to be fairly rambling, jumping around in locations of the stories, and making the reader question how they got from Alaska to Israel. I felt the narratives needed further editing to really polish them and have the desired impact. The Bible study materials in the appendix were quite good and probably could be used whether Fields' main book was read or not. I received an advance electronic copy of the book through Edelweiss for review purposes.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

The Return of Sir Percival: Book 1, Guinivere's Prayer


O'Keefe, S. Alexander. The Return of Sir Percival: Book 1, Guinevere's Prayer. Austin, Texas: Greenleaf Book Publishing Group, 2016.

Sequels to classic literary works either work well or fail miserably. Fortunately this one keeps the reader looking forward to the story unfolding. It's ten years after the fall of Camelot. Everyone believes Sir Percival who went in search of the Holy Grail met his death along the way. Guinivere remains in the abbey. Merlin is still around, mainly putting his "magic" to use for medicinal purposes. Sir Galahad is going by the name Lord Aeron and serving the evil Morgana. This is a wonderful revisit with the Knights of the Round Table. O'Keefe does a great job telling his story, and it's certain to please those who love the Arthurian legend. It's one of my top reads this year. This review is based on an electronic galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Another Me



Wiseman, Eva. Another Me. Toronto: Tundra Books, 2016.

The setting is 14th century Strasbourg where the Jews are accused of poisoning the well water. Kaspar the butcher and his friends have begun persecuting the Jewish community. A Jewish boy named Natan became fascinated with Elena, the daughter of another draper but one who is fair. When Natan confronts Kaspar's gang about what he saw, he is killed and becomes an "ibbur," residing inside the body of Hans, Elena's father's apprentice. Soon the bubonic plague breaks out in the city, while the persecution continues. I am a huge fan of historical fiction, and this title sounded very promising. However, when the plot took on the "ghostly" element, my enjoyment plunged. To be fair to the author, the concept of the "ibbur" began to take hold in the late 13th century. I just felt it was unnecessary in this plot and the plot would be stronger had she allowed Natan to escape. I found the plot implausible. I enjoyed the historical parts about the persecution of the Jews and about the bubonic plague; however, I felt Wiseman's writing was not all that strong. The book is a bit of a mixed bag with some parts enjoyable and others not and with some parts plausible and others not. I received an electronic e-galley of the book from the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

The Northwest Coastal Explorer



Steelquist, Robert. The Northwest Coastal Explorer. Portland, Oregon: Timber Press, 2016.

Author Steelquist examines the habitat along the Pacific Northwestern United States coastline. He shows the diversity of plant and marine life in the region. I was a bit disappointed that the treatment of "places" received so little attention in the book that used that term first in its subtitle. The author generally gives about a page of information per species. A little information that ties it together is included toward the end of the book. The book would be useful for those planning to tour the northwest and are more interested in the natural habitat than the region's history. I received an advance e-galley of the book from the publisher through Net Galley in exchange for a review.

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Kit Kat and Lucy



DuPont, Lonnie Hull. Kit Kat and Lucy: The Country Cats Who Changed a City Girl's World. Grand Rapids: Revell, 2016.

Author Lonnie Hull DuPont relates the story of her move from San Francisco back to her native Michigan. She and her husband purchased an old farm house where a little tortoiseshell kitten that would come to be called Kit Kat adopted them. The author's husband who had severe allergies to cats found he outgrew the allergy so the shots were no longer necessary. It wasn't long until a Russian Blue kitten also found her way to the farm to adopt them. This cat became known as Lucy. She relates the story of getting the two to adjust to one another. Cat owners will see some of their own cats in some of the antics. Kit Kat was misdiagnosed by one vet at an early age. She eventually was diagnosed with FIV. She lived life as full as she could until the owners were forced to put her down. Grab your box of tissues when you get to that chapter. Lucy ends up getting some new playmates and lives a long life. Cat people will enjoy this book which shows how much joy cats bring to owners' lives. This review is based on an e-galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Friday, August 26, 2016

James H. Knight


James H. Knight was born 24 May 18261 in Tennessee,2 probably in Lincoln County.3 His parents were likely Charles W. and Lucy (Evans) Knight.4 He married Susan Flin 14 February 1850 in Itawamba County, Mississippi.5 They are enumerated in District 6 of Itawamba County in 1850.6 Son Joseph William was born 4 June 18526 and son Charles Ephraim was born 15 January 1854.7 In 1860 the family resided in Itawamba County, Mississippi.8 By 1870 James' family resided in neighboring Monroe County in Township 12.9 In 1880 James, Susan, and their younger son Charles Ephraim continued to reside in Monroe County in Boyds Precinct.10 (See the sketch on Joseph William Knight for information on his whereabouts in 1880 and later.) Susan died 20 March 1882 and is buried in Liberty Cemetery.11 James H. married Mary A. Sims Pope 25 March 1886 in Lee County, Mississippi.12 In 1900 they resided in Beat 5 of Monroe County13 next to son Charles.14 James H. died 2 September 1910,15 and although he was living on the official date of the census, he was not enumerated. The mortality schedule for that census is unavailable.






1 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078505 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078505, James H. Knight (24 May 1826-2 Sep 1910), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.


2 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 10, p. 293B (stamped), sheet 10 (written), dwelling 110, family 110, lines 46-48, J. H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-BB1 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658. The Tennessee location is also supported by the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1900 censuses which are cited later in this post.


3 1840 U.S. Federal Census, Lincoln County, Tennessee, District 5, p. 16 (stamped), line 20, Charles Night; digital image, FamilySearch (
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRY-KMP  : accessed 26 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M704, roll 531.

4 “North Carolina, Marriage Index, 1741-2004,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Aug 2016), entry for Lucy Evans-Charles Knight, 28 Aug 1822, Granville County. Lucy appears in the household following James in the 1860 census. See: 1860 U S Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 121 (written), dwelling 791, family 791, lines 21-22, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GZ-26Z267 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583. The names of her children in the 1850 census closely mirror known children of James. See:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 73A (stamped), dwelling 266, family 266, lines 3-11, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LF-WNJ : accessed 26 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 380. Lucy's birth location of Virginia in censuses matches the location James provides for his mother's birth location in the 1880 and 1900 censuses.


5 “Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 Aug 2016), James Knight-Susan Flin marriage, 14 Feb 1850, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


6 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84079111 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the transcribed dates.


7 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84076901 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); memorial no. 84076901, Charles E. Knight (15 Jan 1854-10 Jul 1927), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the transcribed dates.


8 1860 U S Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 121 (written), dwelling 790, family 790, lines 16-20, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GZ-267 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583.


9 1870 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Township 12, p. 212A (stamped), sheet 51, lines 25-28, James Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DC67-B15 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 741.


10 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 10, p. 293B (stamped), sheet 10 (written), dwelling 110, family 110, lines 46-48, J. H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-BB1 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


11 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=84078455&PIpi=141275147 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078455, Susan E. Knight (28 Aug 1827-20 Mar 1882), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall appears to bear a birth date of 29 Aug 1827 rather than 28 August 1827 as was transcribed.


12 "Mississippi Marriages, 1800-1911," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2ZY-Z86 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), J. H. Knight and M. A. Pope, 25 Mar 1886; citing Lee,Mississippi; FHL microfilm 895,858. The maiden name of Sims is supported by her gravestone. See: Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078958 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078958, Mary Sim Knight; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall shows the inscription as “Mary Sims Knight, wife of J. H. Knight.” No dates are inscribed. Although the marker is newer, the person purchasing it obviously knew her maiden name was not Pope.


13 1900 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 5, East of Aberdeen-Richmond Road, SD 1, ED 81, p. 268A (stamped), sheet 1A (written), dwelling 9, family 9, lines 46-47, James Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9XK-BSQ : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 822.


14 1900 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 5, East of Aberdeen-Richmond Road, SD 1, ED 81, p. 268A-B (stamped), sheet 1A-B (written), dwelling 10, family 10, lines 48-52, Chas E Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9XK-BSW: accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 822.


15 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078505 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078505, James H. Knight (24 May 1826-2 Sep 1910), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

The Mannings: The Fall and Rise of a Football Family


Anderson, Lars. The Mannings: The Fall and Rise of a Football Family. New York: Ballantine Books, 2016.

Most people who know me well know I don't cheer for NFL teams but rather for the players. Ever since Peyton left the University of Tennessee, I've cheered first for Peyton. After Eli graduated from Ole Miss, I told everyone I cheered for Peyton first and Eli second. Why? I grew up in Mississippi where Archie Manning was pretty much everyone's hero. Of course, as anyone in Mississippi could tell you, after he went to the Saints, he never had a team with talent. I was small when I followed Archie's career, mostly on a handheld radio broadcasting our home state team. I chose to follow his sons' careers. The author of this book does an excellent job of following Archie and his sons through their college years (and that includes Cooper's short-lived career). He even devotes considerable time to the decisions Peyton and Eli made concerning the choice each made to attend Tennessee and Ole Miss respectively. He does a fairly decent job talking about Archie's professional career, basically reaching the same conclusion that we Mississippians stated for decades. Where he fails is in discussing the professional careers of both Peyton and Eli. Both are given fairly scant attention. There is a wrap-up chapter detailing Peyton's injuries in his late career. If the book had been intended to cover only the college careers of the men, this would have been a 4.5 star book, but the lack of detail on their professional careers where they spent far more time tossing around a football than in high school and college combined weakens the book. In spite of the major flaw, this book will still garner a large audience because it is about the Mannings. Football enthusiasts everywhere, particularly fans of the Mannings and the Southeastern Conference, will want to read it. The book uses the "hidden footnote" system which I hate -- where footnotes exist but no one knows they are there until they flip to the back and see them keyed to specific phrases on certain pages. This review is based on an advance reader's copy e-galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Genealogy Blog Picnic: North Carolina Research

When the topic for this month's blog picnic was announced, I pondered long and hard about what my favorite genealogy resource is. With so many choices, it is difficult to settle on just one. Would I select an archive or repository? I use so many of those, and it really depends on my current research as to which I find most useful at the time. I admit I probably do know which one I would select if forced to choose just one, but I decided against writing about a repository. Would it be genealogical software of some sort? I decided against that route because I'm at a stage in my research that while software is helpful it sometimes gets in the way and writing, rather than data input, helps me make more progress and stay focused. Would it be a research log or form of some sort? I confess I never even considered anything in that category as a candidate. Would it be a website or blog? I use Ancestry and FamilySearch almost daily, but once again, those are too obvious. Would it be Evidence Explained that I use on an almost daily basis? I decided it was too obvious of a selection and wanted to select something else -- something really useful, but perhaps something not quite as well known. I settled on Helen Leary's excellent book, North Carolina Research, which is available for purchase from North Carolina Genealogical Society.

Leary, Helen F. M., ed. North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History. 2nd ed. Raleigh: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996.

This volume, edited by Helen F. M. Leary, is often referred to as the "Bible" of North Carolina research. However, its usefulness extends far beyond the borders of North Carolina. Almost every southeastern state in the United States based its legal system on common law. Leary's discussion helps researchers navigate the system.

Almost every state in which I research has some unique aspect which makes it necessary to understand the systems of conveyance. Leary explains the systems--the Lords Proprietor, headrights, Granville grants, and more.

Leary also includes some chapters on basic skills such as abstracting which are applicable to every genealogist, regardless of location being researched.

The book is on the Board for Certification of Genealogists' supplemental study list. Its chapters are included in bibliographies at major North Carolina universities and at the State Library and Archives dealing with specific types of records. Michael Hait mentions it in his post "Building a Solid Genealogy Library (Part One)."

I decided to find comments by others on the usefulness of this volume. In her 2012 blog post entitled "Finding NC Court Records," Judy Russell calls it "an absolute steal at $55" and goes on to say, "if it's not in that book, you don't need it to do research in North Carolina." On page thirteen of Research in North Carolina, Jeffrey L. Haines calls the book "the essential textbook and reference for family history in the state." Carolyn L. Barkley's post, "North Carolina Research Opportunities in Raleigh," advises readers to consult the volume before making a trip to the state archives. Her post was written prior to the 2009 NGS Conference in Raleigh, but since NGS is revisiting Raleigh in 2017, it is a timely one today. Lisa Lisson speaks of the book's usefulness, particularly in the area of methodology, in her post "A Few of My Favorite Genealogy Things {March 2016}." On the first page, the unspecified author of "Descendants of Andrew Hampton" quotes a section dealing with ages in which persons could own and sell land from Leary's book.

If a person finds a bibliography on North Carolina genealogical or local history research failing to include North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, the author of the bibliography made a serious omission. It would make me question the authority of such a bibliography.

When I attended my first National Genealogical Society Conference, three speakers rose to the top of my "must hear" list quickly. Helen Leary was one of those three. Health issues forced her to retire early from the national speaking circuit. So many persons who only recently began attending conferences missed out on the opportunity to learn from Helen. Fortunately she recorded several webinars available to members of the North Carolina Genealogical Society, giving these persons a "second chance." In my opinion, it is worth joining the society to hear Helen. Even if you decide against that, be sure to purchase the book if you do not own it. Regardless of the state in which you research, you will learn many useful things about genealogical research.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barkley, Carolyn L. "North Carolina Research Opportunities in Raleigh," In Search of Our Common Heritage, 2 Apr 2009 (http://www.genealogyandfamilyhistory.com/north-carolina-research-opportunities-in-raleigh/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Board for Certification of Genealogists. "Supplemental Study List," Board for Certification of Genealogists (http://www.bcgcertification.org/certification/studylist.html : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

"Descendants of Andrew Hampton," Moultrie County Illinois GenWeb (http://moultrie.illinoisgenweb.org/Families/Hampton_Andrew_descendants.pdf : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Haines, Jeffrey L. Research in North Carolina. (NGS Research in the States Series). Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2008.

Hait, Michael. "Building a Solid Genealogy Library (Part One)." Planting the Seeds: Genealogy as a Profession, 30 June 2014 (https://michaelhait.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/building-library-1/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Lisson, Lisa. "A Few of My Favorite Genealogy Things {March 2016}." Lisa Lisson: Genealogist, Blogger, Etsypreneur, 21 Mar 2016 (http://lisalisson.com/2016/03/21/a-few-of-my-favorite-genealogy-things-march-2016/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Russell, Judy. "Finding NC Court Records." The Legal Genealogist, 2 Feb 2012 (http://www.legalgenealogist.com/2012/02/02/finding-nc-court-records/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Apocalypse Rising



Dailey, Timothy. Apocalypse Rising. Grand Rapids: Chosen Books, 2016.

Timothy Dailey offers alternative interpretations to end times prophecies in this work. He argues interpreting Gog and Magog as Russia was a product of the Cold War with little evidence, yet he offers little concrete evidence to support his alternate theory. He also discusses the rise of Islam and fall of Western civilization, and America's "role" in end times. At many times, it seemed to be an updated version of Armageddon, Oil, and the Middle East Crisis,  reimagined based on current Middle Eastern happenings. The book is not as readable as some of the works that were produced in the 1970s and 1980s, but it is certain to attract a large audience because of interest in end times prophecies. It does deserve an audience, if only to consider whether interpretations of the past were based on the political climate of the time. Some may agree with the author's conclusions; others will not. The evidence is not overwhelmingly convincing. The author missed out on a great opportunity to remind his readers it doesn't matter how the end times play out because we already know Christ has won. Instead of focusing on encouraging believers, he leaves them with a grim outlook on the future. Perhaps the author should have concluded with the words to the persecuted church in Smyrna: "Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life." (Rev. 2:10 NKJV). This review is based on an advance reader's egalley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Joseph William Knight




1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 293B-294A (stamped), p. 10-11 (written), dwelling 111, family 111, lines 49-50, 1-2, J. W. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBV-8X6 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.

Knight, J. W., W, M, 28, head, married, farmer, MS, TN, MS
–, Julia, W, F, 24, wife, married, keeping house, MS, MS, MS
–, M. S., W, F, 3, dau, single, at home, MS, MS, MS
–, H. W., W, M, 1, son, single, at home, MS, MS, MS

Joseph William Knight was born 15 June 18521 to James and Susannah (or Susan) Knight.2 He was enumerated in Bigby Fork, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1860.3 By 1870, J. W., living with his parents and siblings, resided in Township 12 of Monroe County, Mississippi.4 The census states it was a Smithville post office; however, it does not specify whether it was range 7, 8, or 9. Based on the neighbors, the family was living in range 8. Although this township includes the Lost Corner area and the area along Old Highway 6 near Malone Lake where Dock's family eventually settled, the family probably resided about halfway between the present-day city of Amory and town of Smithville.



It is not known when or where Joseph William married Julia Ridings,5 but it was likely about 1875 since the oldest child in the 1880 census is three. Daughter Mollie was born 24 Nov 1876.6 Son William H. was born 17 Feb 1879.7 The couple was living in Boyds Precinct, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1880 along with their two young children.8 Daughter Virgie I. was born 5 October 1882.9 Daughter Gertrude F. was born October 1885.10 Son James P. was born 20 May 1888.11 Son Charles Emmett was born 29 August 1892.12 In 1900, Joseph William, Julia, and the four younger children are residing in Boyds Precinct in Monroe County.13 According to the 1900 census, Julia was the mother of six children, all living.14 By 1910, it states she had seven children with only six living.15 The identity of the seventh child is unknown. A search at Find A Grave on the surname Knight resulted in no possibilities for this child in a currently marked and transcribed grave.

Joseph William Knight died 9 February 1909 and is buried at Liberty Cemetery16 along the Itawamba/Monroe County line. Julia was enumerated in Boyds, Precinct, Monroe County, Mississippi in 1910 with her sons James P. and Emmett, and Emmett's wife, Flora Bell,17 nee Worthy.18 Julia died 21 May 1916 and is also buried at Liberty Cemetery.19






1 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall indicates the date of birth was 15 Jun 1852.


2 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Bigby Fork, p. 121 (written), dwelling 790, family 790, lines 16-20, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9BS3-FDK : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583; also 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Township 12, Smithville post office, p. 212A (stamped), sheet 51 (written), dwelling 328, family 377, lines 25-28, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DC67-B15 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 741. The 1850 census shows James and Susannah were married by that date, showing Susannah was not a stepmother. 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, District 6, p. 331A (stamped), dwelling 394, family 400, lines 18-19, James Night household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-64KS-CG3 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 373.


3 1860 U.S. census, Itawamba Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 121 (written), dwell. & fam. 790, James Knight household.


4 1870 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 212A (stamped), dw. 328, fam. 377, James Knight household.


5 “Tennessee Death Records, 1908-1958,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), Mrs. Mollie Taylor, 24 Aug 1922, Shelby County, Tennessee, certificate no. 426; citing unspecified records on file at Tennessee State Library & Archives.


6 Ibid.


7 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84077662, W. H. Knight (17 Feb 1879-13 Jun 1921), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall shows a death date of 18 Jun 1921. Although enumerated as H. W. in 1880, he is consistently enumerated as William H. in later censuses. See 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 3, SD 1, ED 39, p. 181A (stamped), sheet 3A (written), dwelling 42, family 42, lines 23-25, Littie C. McDaniel household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M961-GQB : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 811; 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Bigby Fork, SD 1, ED 17, p. 95B (stamped), sheet 24B (written), dwelling 389, family 389, lines 76-82, Littie McDaniel household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MP8K-58J : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 743; and 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Hatley, SD 1, ED 26, p. 208B (stamped), sheet 5B (written), dwelling 98, family 98, lines 85-90, William H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MNTM-VQD : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T625, roll 886.


8 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 293B-294A (stamped), p. 10-11 (written), dwelling 111, family 111, lines 49-50, 1-2, J. W. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBV-8X6 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


9 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84683918, Virgie K. Edwards (5 Oct 1882-5 Oct 1966), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death dates.


10 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 80, p. 258A (stamped), sheet 2 (written), dwelling 29, family 29, line 43, Gertrude F. Knight; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-XCHQ-NMX : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M623, roll 822. Gertrude’s cemetery marker provides only a birth year. See Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84780497, Gertrude Edwards (1885-1920), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death years.


11 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079411, James P. Knight (20 May 1888-24 May 1913), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death years as well as his parents.


12 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 83652523, Charlie Emmett Knight (29 Aug 1892-1 Feb 1951), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.


13 1900 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 258A (stamped), dwell. & fam. 29, Joseph W. Knight family.


14 1900 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 258A (stamped), dwell. & fam. 29, line 41, Julia Knight.


15 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 124, p. 75A (stamped), dwelling 32, family 34, line 7, Julia A. Knight; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MPDC-VFH : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 752.


16 Find A Grave, memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


17 1910 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 75A (stamped), dwell.. 32, fam. 34, Julia A. Knight household.


18 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 83652571, Flora Bell Worthy Knight (1893-1 Sep 1915), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Monroe County, Mississippi. The accompany photograph by Lionel Stegall shows her name as Florabell, but it supports the birth year and death date as transcribed as well as her status as Emmet’s wife.


19 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079353, Julia A Knight (10 May 1851-21 May 1916), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

M. L. Morris & M. R. Wilson

Today's installment is basically an exercise in demonstrating online records will not provide everything one needs to do genealogical research.



1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 11, M. L. Morris household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBV-8DQ : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.

Morris, M L, (head), W, M, 22, –, Married, Farmer, MS, NC, MS
–, S E, W, F, 21, wife, Married, At home, TN, NC, TN
–, W A, W, M, 3, son, Single, At home, MS, MS, TN
–, A O, W, F, 3/12 (Mar), dau, Single, At home, MS, MS, TN
–, J I, W, M, 14, brother, Single, At home, MS, NC, TN
–, W F, W, M, 12, brother, Single, At home, MS, NC, TN
Wilson, M R, W, F, 40, mother-in-law, Widowed, At home, TN, NC, NC
–, W J, W, M, 17, brother-in-law, Single, At home, TN, NC, MS
–, G W, W, M, 14, brother-in-law, Single, At home, TN, NC, MS
–, J R, W, M, 11, brother-in-law, Single, At home, TN, NC, MS
–, M B, W, F, 8, sister-in-law, Single, At home, TN, NC, MS

Very little is easily found on M. L. Morris. Marion Morris married Bettie Wilson 2 July 1878 in adjacent Lee County. Bettie is a common nickname for Elizabeth, so it likely matches the S. E. enumerated in 1880. No Morris family matching or nearly matching the information found in the 1880 census was located in either the 1860 or 1870 censuses. It is probable they were living in the same "Lost Corner" area with the Hester family during that period.This Lost Corner is an area of Monroe County accessible only by entering it through a road that begins and ends in Itawamba County with no other connections at one time to Monroe County roads. On the below map, the county lines are not shown. The Monroe-Itawamba line runs between Clay Hill Road (in Monroe County on the north side of Highway 371) and Carolina Road (in Itawamba County on the south side of Highway 371). Overlook Road now provides a means into Monroe County.




Ancestry's suggested records feature hints that the M. C. Morris and wife Synthia in the 1900 Wynne, Cross County, Arkansas census may be this family. It is troublesome that the middle initial appears to be incorrect in one of the censuses if that is the case. Synthia would certainly match the "S" in the S. E., presumably making the wife's name Synthia Elizabeth. The census indicates they had been married 22 years, providing a date of about 1877-1878.2 With a June 1 census date and the actual enumeration taking place that same date, one would expect the length of marriage to be 21 years, but since they married in July, it is so close to 22 years one can see they might have said 22. No children born prior to 1880 are included to provide further insight. In fact, it would appear that both children enumerated in 1880 and three others died before 1900 if this census is the same family since Synthia is the mother of nine children with only four living, all of which are enumerated.3

I am uncomfortable concluding these are the same families without additional evidence. I know of no connections other than being neighbors to my Hester or Harris families who resided in the area so I will not likely pursue the family further.

Efforts to identify M. R. Wilson in earlier censuses failed, even when using probable names for some of the children such as "George" for G. W., since that is like George Washington and "Bettie" or "Elizabeth." No family with probably matches of approximately the right age and matching at least one of the initials for M. R. as mother, and S. E. as a daughter (in both 1860 and 1870), and W. J., G. W., and J. R. as sons (in 1870) were found in Tennessee. No one was found in the 1900 census, and no probable marriage records for any of the persons were located in Monroe, Itawamba, or Lee Counties. The initials only make it difficult to trace, and no suggested records are provided at Ancestry when clicking on the individuals in the record. Once again, I know of no connection to my Hester or Harris families so I do not plan to pursue the family further.


1 “Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), Marion Morris-Bettie Wilson marriage, 2 Jul 1878, Lee County, Mississippi; citing Hunting For Bears, Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935 (Provo, Utah: Ancestry.com Operations, 2004).
2 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Cross County, Arkansas, population schedule, Wynne, SD 1, ED 28, p. 263A (stamped), sheet 24A (written), dwelling 447, family 459, lines 35-40, M C Morris family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6GT4-SKM : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 57.
3 Ibid.
4 FOOTNOTE
5 FOOTNOTE

Monday, August 08, 2016

Joseph F. Knight




1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 113, family 113, lines 14-19, J. F. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-B1J : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.

Knight, J. F., W, M, 44, --, Farmer, TN, VA, VA
--, E., W, F, 46, Wife, Keeping house, AL, AL, AL
--, M. A., W, F, 16, Daughter, At home, MS, TN, AL
--, E. B., W, F, 12, Daughter, At home, MS, TN, AL
--, L. S., W, F, 8, Daughter, At home, MS, TN, AL
--, Joanna, W, F, 6, Daughter, At home, MS, TN, AL

Joseph F. "Joe" Knight was born 14 August 18381 in Tennessee2 to Charles Knight3 and his wife Lucy Evans Knight.4 He appears on the 1850 census for Pontotoc County, Mississippi.5 He married Elizabeth Gray 7 May 1857 in Itawamba County, Mississippi.6 Daughter Florence was born prior to the wedding on 4 February 1857.7 It is unknown whether she was conceived out of wedlock or adopted by Joseph. Elizabeth Gray's name on her tombstone indicates her name is Elizabeth Carlow Knight. No marriage between a Gray and Carlow (or Harlow, which is a more common surname for this geographic area) has been located in Mississippi or Tennessee. Comparing the DNA of Florence's descendants against that of her siblings' descent would probably show whether or not they shared the same father.

Son Mark A. was born 28 June 1859,8 probably in Monroe County, Mississippi. He died at the age of seven on 2 December 1866.9 Daughter Verona A. was born 4 August 1861.10 She died the day before her eighth birthday on 3 August 1869.11 Daughter Margaret A. was born about 1863.12 Several online family trees suggest her date of birth was 22 October 1863 and she died 30 October 1888,13 but all lack documentation for these assertions.

Son William T. was born 15 October 1865 and died four days later on 19 October 1865.14 Daughter Helen Bell was born 17 September 1867,15 probably in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Daughter Lucy Susie was born 24 Aug 1869,16 likely in Itawamba County.

The family was enumerated in Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1870.17 Daughter Julia,18 enumerated as Joanna in 1880,19 was born in March 1872.20 The family was enumerated in Monroe County, Mississippi in 1880.21 The family moved to Texas by October 1890 when grandson George W. Edwards, son of Helen, was born.22

Joe died 11 April 1900 in Lee County, Texas and was buried at the Lawhon Springs Cemetery in Blue.23 His wife Elizabeth, enumerated as Elise, resided with daughter Susie at the time the 1900 census was taken.24 She died 23 April 1901 and was also buried at Lawhon Springs Cemetery.25



1 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23298307 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 23298307, Joseph F. Knight (14 Aug 1838-11 Apr 1900), created by Sarah Locklin Taylor; citing Lawhon Springs Cemetery, Blue, Lee County, Texas.


2 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 113, family 113, lines 14-19, J. F. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-B1J : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658. The Tennessee birthplace is supported by all other censuses.


3 “North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 6 Aug 2016), Charles Knight-Lucy Evans, 28 Aug 1822; citing Granville County Marriage Bonds – Abstracts (1760-1957), RG 48 North Carolina County Registers of Deeds, p. 93 (stamped).


4 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 73A (stamped), dwelling 266, family 266, lines 3-11, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LF-WNJ : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 3880. Her surname comes from “North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 6 Aug 2016), Charles Knight-Lucy Evans, 28 Aug 1822; citing Granville County Marriage Bonds – Abstracts (1760-1957), RG 48 North Carolina County Registers of Deeds, p. 93 (stamped).


5 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 73A (stamped), dwelling 266, family 266, lines 3-11, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LF-WNJ : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 3880.


6 Hunting for Bears, “Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 Aug 2016), Joseph Knight-Elizabeth Gray marriage, 7 May 1857; citing unspecified Itawamba County, Mississippi marriage book.


7 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24439020 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 24439020, Florence F. Knight Ridings (4 Feb 1857-2 Dec 1921), created by “Lin”; citing Kensett Cemetery, Kensett, White County, Arkansas.


8 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61744915 : accessed 6 Aug 2016); memorial no. 61744915, Mark A. Knight (28 Jun 1859-2 Dec 1866), created by Paul Armstrong; citing New Chapel Cemetery, Evergreen, Itawamba County, Mississippi. Mark was enumerated as M. A. in the 1860 census. 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Western Division, Aberdeen post office, p. 427 (written), sheet 3 (written), dwelling 16, family 16, lines 10-14, Joseph Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GF-VRZ : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 587.


9 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61744915 : accessed 6 Aug 2016); memorial no. 61744915, Mark A. Knight (28 Jun 1859-2 Dec 1866), created by Paul Armstrong; citing New Chapel Cemetery, Evergreen, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


10 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61744967 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 61744967, Verona A. Knight (4 Aug 1861-3 Aug 1869), created by Paul Armstrong; citing New Chapel Cemetery, Evergreen, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


11 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61744967 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 61744967, Verona A. Knight (4 Aug 1861-3 Aug 1869), created by Paul Armstrong; citing New Chapel Cemetery, Evergreen, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


12 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, Township 11, p. 391B (written), sheet 2, dwelling 10, family 10, lines 17-23, Joseph Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF38-KHN : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 732. Also 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 113, family 113, lines 14-19, J. F. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-B1J : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


13 “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 August 2016), “Aldridge Family Tree” by calvinandelysealdridge, profile for Margaret A. Knight (1863-1888, d. Monroe County, Mississippi), undocumented data; also “Talbot Family Tree” by rptalbot1; “Seals Walker Family Tree” by akumal4me1; “Catherine; Family Tree” by Catherine Lannholm; “Jennifer Bethea Family Tree” by Jennifer Bethea; “Sorrels/West Family Tree” by bjsorrels1; “Ridings Family Tree” by Neldagailr1; “King & Hulsey X3 + More” family tree by PeggyTruesdale70; “BurnettConnections” family tree by Burnett Connections; “Miller Family Tree” by Kelly Parr; “Richardson Family Tree” by rockmytooth; and “Knight Family Tree” by lak31760.


14 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61744841 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 61744841, William T. Knight (15 Oct 1865-19 Oct 1865), created by Paul Armstrong; citing New Chapel Cemetery, Evergreen, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


15 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Lee County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct 3, SD 10, ED 58, p. 46A (stamped), sheet 1, dwelling 9, family 9, Mack Edwards family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6XBS-R48 : accessed 6 August 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1654. This source supports the birth month of September 1867. Exact date from 
“Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 August 2016), “BurnettConnections” family tree by Burnett Connections..

16 “Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-1982,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 Aug 2016), entry for Susie Knight Ridings (24 Apr 1869-10 Oct 1943), certificate 44708; citing Texas Department of State Health Services, Texas Death Certificates, 1903-1982. This birth is supported by the 1870 census. See 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, Township 11, p. 391B (written), sheet 2, dwelling 10, family 10, lines 17-23, Joseph Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF38-KHN : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 732.


17 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, Township 11, p. 391B (written), sheet 2, dwelling 10, family 10, lines 17-23, Joseph Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF38-KHN : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 732.


18 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Lee County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct 3, SD 10, ED 58, p. 46A (stamped), sheet 1, dwelling 8, family 8, lines 31-33, George D. Baker household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M3PZ-NJV : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1654. A marriage record to George D. Baker has not been located. She is, however, residing in the house adjacent to sister Helen, and the information on the birth locations of the parents, although erroneous for the mother, matches, making this something likely known by relatives who created the tree. The relationship to George D. Baker can be found in online trees such as 
“Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 August 2016), “BurnettConnections” family tree by Burnett Connections and "Jones Family Tree" by PJ7625.

19 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 113, family 113, lines 14-19, J. F. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-B1J : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


20 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Lee County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct 3, SD 10, ED 58, p. 46A (stamped), sheet 1, dwelling 8, family 8, lines 31-33, George D. Baker household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M3PZ-NJV : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1654.


21 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 294A (stamped), p. 11 (written), dwelling 113, family 113, lines 14-19, J. F. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-B1J : accessed 6 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


22 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Lee County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct 3, SD 10, ED 58, p. 46A (stamped), sheet 1, dwelling 9, family 9, Mack Edwards family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6XBS-R48 : accessed 6 August 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1654.


23 “U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 Aug 2016), Joe F. Knight (14 Aug 1838-11 Apr 1900); citing Applications for Headstones for U. S. Military Veterans, 1925-1941, National Archives RG92, Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, microfilm publication M1916, 134 rolls. Also Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23298307 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 23298307, Joseph F. Knight (14 Aug 1838-11 Apr 1900), created by Sarah Locklin Taylor; citing Lawhon Springs Cemetery, Blue, Lee County, Texas.


24 1900 U. S. Federal Census, Fayette County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct 1, LaGrange, SD 12, ED 29, p. 25A (stamped), sheet 7 (written), dwelling 92, family 93, lines 1-7, J. P. Ridings household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M3GQ-3WT : accessed 6 August 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1634.


25 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23298304 : accessed 6 Aug 2016), memorial no. 23298304, Elizabeth Carlow Knight (26 Aug 1834-23 Apr 1901), created by Sarah Locklin Taylor; citing Lawhon Springs Cemetery, Blue, Lee County, Texas.