Smoky Mountain Family Historian

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

The Northwest Coastal Explorer



Steelquist, Robert. The Northwest Coastal Explorer. Portland, Oregon: Timber Press, 2016.

Author Steelquist examines the habitat along the Pacific Northwestern United States coastline. He shows the diversity of plant and marine life in the region. I was a bit disappointed that the treatment of "places" received so little attention in the book that used that term first in its subtitle. The author generally gives about a page of information per species. A little information that ties it together is included toward the end of the book. The book would be useful for those planning to tour the northwest and are more interested in the natural habitat than the region's history. I received an advance e-galley of the book from the publisher through Net Galley in exchange for a review.

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Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Kit Kat and Lucy



DuPont, Lonnie Hull. Kit Kat and Lucy: The Country Cats Who Changed a City Girl's World. Grand Rapids: Revell, 2016.

Author Lonnie Hull DuPont relates the story of her move from San Francisco back to her native Michigan. She and her husband purchased an old farm house where a little tortoiseshell kitten that would come to be called Kit Kat adopted them. The author's husband who had severe allergies to cats found he outgrew the allergy so the shots were no longer necessary. It wasn't long until a Russian Blue kitten also found her way to the farm to adopt them. This cat became known as Lucy. She relates the story of getting the two to adjust to one another. Cat owners will see some of their own cats in some of the antics. Kit Kat was misdiagnosed by one vet at an early age. She eventually was diagnosed with FIV. She lived life as full as she could until the owners were forced to put her down. Grab your box of tissues when you get to that chapter. Lucy ends up getting some new playmates and lives a long life. Cat people will enjoy this book which shows how much joy cats bring to owners' lives. This review is based on an e-galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

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Friday, August 26, 2016

James H. Knight


James H. Knight was born 24 May 18261 in Tennessee,2 probably in Lincoln County.3 His parents were likely Charles W. and Lucy (Evans) Knight.4 He married Susan Flin 14 February 1850 in Itawamba County, Mississippi.5 They are enumerated in District 6 of Itawamba County in 1850.6 Son Joseph William was born 4 June 18526 and son Charles Ephraim was born 15 January 1854.7 In 1860 the family resided in Itawamba County, Mississippi.8 By 1870 James' family resided in neighboring Monroe County in Township 12.9 In 1880 James, Susan, and their younger son Charles Ephraim continued to reside in Monroe County in Boyds Precinct.10 (See the sketch on Joseph William Knight for information on his whereabouts in 1880 and later.) Susan died 20 March 1882 and is buried in Liberty Cemetery.11 James H. married Mary A. Sims Pope 25 March 1886 in Lee County, Mississippi.12 In 1900 they resided in Beat 5 of Monroe County13 next to son Charles.14 James H. died 2 September 1910,15 and although he was living on the official date of the census, he was not enumerated. The mortality schedule for that census is unavailable.






1 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078505 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078505, James H. Knight (24 May 1826-2 Sep 1910), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.


2 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 10, p. 293B (stamped), sheet 10 (written), dwelling 110, family 110, lines 46-48, J. H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-BB1 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658. The Tennessee location is also supported by the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1900 censuses which are cited later in this post.


3 1840 U.S. Federal Census, Lincoln County, Tennessee, District 5, p. 16 (stamped), line 20, Charles Night; digital image, FamilySearch (
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRY-KMP  : accessed 26 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M704, roll 531.

4 “North Carolina, Marriage Index, 1741-2004,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Aug 2016), entry for Lucy Evans-Charles Knight, 28 Aug 1822, Granville County. Lucy appears in the household following James in the 1860 census. See: 1860 U S Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 121 (written), dwelling 791, family 791, lines 21-22, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GZ-26Z267 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583. The names of her children in the 1850 census closely mirror known children of James. See:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 73A (stamped), dwelling 266, family 266, lines 3-11, Lucy Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LF-WNJ : accessed 26 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 380. Lucy's birth location of Virginia in censuses matches the location James provides for his mother's birth location in the 1880 and 1900 censuses.


5 “Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 Aug 2016), James Knight-Susan Flin marriage, 14 Feb 1850, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


6 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84079111 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the transcribed dates.


7 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84076901 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); memorial no. 84076901, Charles E. Knight (15 Jan 1854-10 Jul 1927), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the transcribed dates.


8 1860 U S Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 121 (written), dwelling 790, family 790, lines 16-20, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GZ-267 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583.


9 1870 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Township 12, p. 212A (stamped), sheet 51, lines 25-28, James Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DC67-B15 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 741.


10 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 10, p. 293B (stamped), sheet 10 (written), dwelling 110, family 110, lines 46-48, J. H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4G5-BB1 : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


11 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=84078455&PIpi=141275147 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078455, Susan E. Knight (28 Aug 1827-20 Mar 1882), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall appears to bear a birth date of 29 Aug 1827 rather than 28 August 1827 as was transcribed.


12 "Mississippi Marriages, 1800-1911," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2ZY-Z86 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), J. H. Knight and M. A. Pope, 25 Mar 1886; citing Lee,Mississippi; FHL microfilm 895,858. The maiden name of Sims is supported by her gravestone. See: Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078958 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078958, Mary Sim Knight; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall shows the inscription as “Mary Sims Knight, wife of J. H. Knight.” No dates are inscribed. Although the marker is newer, the person purchasing it obviously knew her maiden name was not Pope.


13 1900 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 5, East of Aberdeen-Richmond Road, SD 1, ED 81, p. 268A (stamped), sheet 1A (written), dwelling 9, family 9, lines 46-47, James Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9XK-BSQ : accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 822.


14 1900 U S Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 5, East of Aberdeen-Richmond Road, SD 1, ED 81, p. 268A-B (stamped), sheet 1A-B (written), dwelling 10, family 10, lines 48-52, Chas E Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9XK-BSW: accessed 25 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 822.


15 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84078505 : accessed 25 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84078505, James H. Knight (24 May 1826-2 Sep 1910), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.

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Tuesday, August 23, 2016

The Mannings: The Fall and Rise of a Football Family


Anderson, Lars. The Mannings: The Fall and Rise of a Football Family. New York: Ballantine Books, 2016.

Most people who know me well know I don't cheer for NFL teams but rather for the players. Ever since Peyton left the University of Tennessee, I've cheered first for Peyton. After Eli graduated from Ole Miss, I told everyone I cheered for Peyton first and Eli second. Why? I grew up in Mississippi where Archie Manning was pretty much everyone's hero. Of course, as anyone in Mississippi could tell you, after he went to the Saints, he never had a team with talent. I was small when I followed Archie's career, mostly on a handheld radio broadcasting our home state team. I chose to follow his sons' careers. The author of this book does an excellent job of following Archie and his sons through their college years (and that includes Cooper's short-lived career). He even devotes considerable time to the decisions Peyton and Eli made concerning the choice each made to attend Tennessee and Ole Miss respectively. He does a fairly decent job talking about Archie's professional career, basically reaching the same conclusion that we Mississippians stated for decades. Where he fails is in discussing the professional careers of both Peyton and Eli. Both are given fairly scant attention. There is a wrap-up chapter detailing Peyton's injuries in his late career. If the book had been intended to cover only the college careers of the men, this would have been a 4.5 star book, but the lack of detail on their professional careers where they spent far more time tossing around a football than in high school and college combined weakens the book. In spite of the major flaw, this book will still garner a large audience because it is about the Mannings. Football enthusiasts everywhere, particularly fans of the Mannings and the Southeastern Conference, will want to read it. The book uses the "hidden footnote" system which I hate -- where footnotes exist but no one knows they are there until they flip to the back and see them keyed to specific phrases on certain pages. This review is based on an advance reader's copy e-galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

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Sunday, August 21, 2016

Genealogy Blog Picnic: North Carolina Research

When the topic for this month's blog picnic was announced, I pondered long and hard about what my favorite genealogy resource is. With so many choices, it is difficult to settle on just one. Would I select an archive or repository? I use so many of those, and it really depends on my current research as to which I find most useful at the time. I admit I probably do know which one I would select if forced to choose just one, but I decided against writing about a repository. Would it be genealogical software of some sort? I decided against that route because I'm at a stage in my research that while software is helpful it sometimes gets in the way and writing, rather than data input, helps me make more progress and stay focused. Would it be a research log or form of some sort? I confess I never even considered anything in that category as a candidate. Would it be a website or blog? I use Ancestry and FamilySearch almost daily, but once again, those are too obvious. Would it be Evidence Explained that I use on an almost daily basis? I decided it was too obvious of a selection and wanted to select something else -- something really useful, but perhaps something not quite as well known. I settled on Helen Leary's excellent book, North Carolina Research, which is available for purchase from North Carolina Genealogical Society.

Leary, Helen F. M., ed. North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History. 2nd ed. Raleigh: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996.

This volume, edited by Helen F. M. Leary, is often referred to as the "Bible" of North Carolina research. However, its usefulness extends far beyond the borders of North Carolina. Almost every southeastern state in the United States based its legal system on common law. Leary's discussion helps researchers navigate the system.

Almost every state in which I research has some unique aspect which makes it necessary to understand the systems of conveyance. Leary explains the systems--the Lords Proprietor, headrights, Granville grants, and more.

Leary also includes some chapters on basic skills such as abstracting which are applicable to every genealogist, regardless of location being researched.

The book is on the Board for Certification of Genealogists' supplemental study list. Its chapters are included in bibliographies at major North Carolina universities and at the State Library and Archives dealing with specific types of records. Michael Hait mentions it in his post "Building a Solid Genealogy Library (Part One)."

I decided to find comments by others on the usefulness of this volume. In her 2012 blog post entitled "Finding NC Court Records," Judy Russell calls it "an absolute steal at $55" and goes on to say, "if it's not in that book, you don't need it to do research in North Carolina." On page thirteen of Research in North Carolina, Jeffrey L. Haines calls the book "the essential textbook and reference for family history in the state." Carolyn L. Barkley's post, "North Carolina Research Opportunities in Raleigh," advises readers to consult the volume before making a trip to the state archives. Her post was written prior to the 2009 NGS Conference in Raleigh, but since NGS is revisiting Raleigh in 2017, it is a timely one today. Lisa Lisson speaks of the book's usefulness, particularly in the area of methodology, in her post "A Few of My Favorite Genealogy Things {March 2016}." On the first page, the unspecified author of "Descendants of Andrew Hampton" quotes a section dealing with ages in which persons could own and sell land from Leary's book.

If a person finds a bibliography on North Carolina genealogical or local history research failing to include North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, the author of the bibliography made a serious omission. It would make me question the authority of such a bibliography.

When I attended my first National Genealogical Society Conference, three speakers rose to the top of my "must hear" list quickly. Helen Leary was one of those three. Health issues forced her to retire early from the national speaking circuit. So many persons who only recently began attending conferences missed out on the opportunity to learn from Helen. Fortunately she recorded several webinars available to members of the North Carolina Genealogical Society, giving these persons a "second chance." In my opinion, it is worth joining the society to hear Helen. Even if you decide against that, be sure to purchase the book if you do not own it. Regardless of the state in which you research, you will learn many useful things about genealogical research.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barkley, Carolyn L. "North Carolina Research Opportunities in Raleigh," In Search of Our Common Heritage, 2 Apr 2009 (http://www.genealogyandfamilyhistory.com/north-carolina-research-opportunities-in-raleigh/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Board for Certification of Genealogists. "Supplemental Study List," Board for Certification of Genealogists (http://www.bcgcertification.org/certification/studylist.html : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

"Descendants of Andrew Hampton," Moultrie County Illinois GenWeb (http://moultrie.illinoisgenweb.org/Families/Hampton_Andrew_descendants.pdf : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Haines, Jeffrey L. Research in North Carolina. (NGS Research in the States Series). Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2008.

Hait, Michael. "Building a Solid Genealogy Library (Part One)." Planting the Seeds: Genealogy as a Profession, 30 June 2014 (https://michaelhait.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/building-library-1/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Lisson, Lisa. "A Few of My Favorite Genealogy Things {March 2016}." Lisa Lisson: Genealogist, Blogger, Etsypreneur, 21 Mar 2016 (http://lisalisson.com/2016/03/21/a-few-of-my-favorite-genealogy-things-march-2016/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

Russell, Judy. "Finding NC Court Records." The Legal Genealogist, 2 Feb 2012 (http://www.legalgenealogist.com/2012/02/02/finding-nc-court-records/ : accessed 20 Aug 2016).

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Thursday, August 18, 2016

Apocalypse Rising



Dailey, Timothy. Apocalypse Rising. Grand Rapids: Chosen Books, 2016.

Timothy Dailey offers alternative interpretations to end times prophecies in this work. He argues interpreting Gog and Magog as Russia was a product of the Cold War with little evidence, yet he offers little concrete evidence to support his alternate theory. He also discusses the rise of Islam and fall of Western civilization, and America's "role" in end times. At many times, it seemed to be an updated version of Armageddon, Oil, and the Middle East Crisis,  reimagined based on current Middle Eastern happenings. The book is not as readable as some of the works that were produced in the 1970s and 1980s, but it is certain to attract a large audience because of interest in end times prophecies. It does deserve an audience, if only to consider whether interpretations of the past were based on the political climate of the time. Some may agree with the author's conclusions; others will not. The evidence is not overwhelmingly convincing. The author missed out on a great opportunity to remind his readers it doesn't matter how the end times play out because we already know Christ has won. Instead of focusing on encouraging believers, he leaves them with a grim outlook on the future. Perhaps the author should have concluded with the words to the persecuted church in Smyrna: "Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life." (Rev. 2:10 NKJV). This review is based on an advance reader's egalley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes.

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Sunday, August 14, 2016

Joseph William Knight




1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 293B-294A (stamped), p. 10-11 (written), dwelling 111, family 111, lines 49-50, 1-2, J. W. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBV-8X6 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.

Knight, J. W., W, M, 28, head, married, farmer, MS, TN, MS
–, Julia, W, F, 24, wife, married, keeping house, MS, MS, MS
–, M. S., W, F, 3, dau, single, at home, MS, MS, MS
–, H. W., W, M, 1, son, single, at home, MS, MS, MS

Joseph William Knight was born 15 June 18521 to James and Susannah (or Susan) Knight.2 He was enumerated in Bigby Fork, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1860.3 By 1870, J. W., living with his parents and siblings, resided in Township 12 of Monroe County, Mississippi.4 The census states it was a Smithville post office; however, it does not specify whether it was range 7, 8, or 9. Based on the neighbors, the family was living in range 8. Although this township includes the Lost Corner area and the area along Old Highway 6 near Malone Lake where Dock's family eventually settled, the family probably resided about halfway between the present-day city of Amory and town of Smithville.



It is not known when or where Joseph William married Julia Ridings,5 but it was likely about 1875 since the oldest child in the 1880 census is three. Daughter Mollie was born 24 Nov 1876.6 Son William H. was born 17 Feb 1879.7 The couple was living in Boyds Precinct, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1880 along with their two young children.8 Daughter Virgie I. was born 5 October 1882.9 Daughter Gertrude F. was born October 1885.10 Son James P. was born 20 May 1888.11 Son Charles Emmett was born 29 August 1892.12 In 1900, Joseph William, Julia, and the four younger children are residing in Boyds Precinct in Monroe County.13 According to the 1900 census, Julia was the mother of six children, all living.14 By 1910, it states she had seven children with only six living.15 The identity of the seventh child is unknown. A search at Find A Grave on the surname Knight resulted in no possibilities for this child in a currently marked and transcribed grave.

Joseph William Knight died 9 February 1909 and is buried at Liberty Cemetery16 along the Itawamba/Monroe County line. Julia was enumerated in Boyds, Precinct, Monroe County, Mississippi in 1910 with her sons James P. and Emmett, and Emmett's wife, Flora Bell,17 nee Worthy.18 Julia died 21 May 1916 and is also buried at Liberty Cemetery.19






1 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall indicates the date of birth was 15 Jun 1852.


2 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Bigby Fork, p. 121 (written), dwelling 790, family 790, lines 16-20, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9BS3-FDK : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 583; also 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Township 12, Smithville post office, p. 212A (stamped), sheet 51 (written), dwelling 328, family 377, lines 25-28, James Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DC67-B15 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 741. The 1850 census shows James and Susannah were married by that date, showing Susannah was not a stepmother. 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, District 6, p. 331A (stamped), dwelling 394, family 400, lines 18-19, James Night household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-64KS-CG3 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 373.


3 1860 U.S. census, Itawamba Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 121 (written), dwell. & fam. 790, James Knight household.


4 1870 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 212A (stamped), dw. 328, fam. 377, James Knight household.


5 “Tennessee Death Records, 1908-1958,” database with images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), Mrs. Mollie Taylor, 24 Aug 1922, Shelby County, Tennessee, certificate no. 426; citing unspecified records on file at Tennessee State Library & Archives.


6 Ibid.


7 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84077662, W. H. Knight (17 Feb 1879-13 Jun 1921), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall shows a death date of 18 Jun 1921. Although enumerated as H. W. in 1880, he is consistently enumerated as William H. in later censuses. See 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Beat 3, SD 1, ED 39, p. 181A (stamped), sheet 3A (written), dwelling 42, family 42, lines 23-25, Littie C. McDaniel household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M961-GQB : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 811; 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, population schedule, Bigby Fork, SD 1, ED 17, p. 95B (stamped), sheet 24B (written), dwelling 389, family 389, lines 76-82, Littie McDaniel household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MP8K-58J : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 743; and 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Hatley, SD 1, ED 26, p. 208B (stamped), sheet 5B (written), dwelling 98, family 98, lines 85-90, William H. Knight family; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MNTM-VQD : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T625, roll 886.


8 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 139, p. 293B-294A (stamped), p. 10-11 (written), dwelling 111, family 111, lines 49-50, 1-2, J. W. Knight household; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBV-8X6 : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 658.


9 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84683918, Virgie K. Edwards (5 Oct 1882-5 Oct 1966), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death dates.


10 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 80, p. 258A (stamped), sheet 2 (written), dwelling 29, family 29, line 43, Gertrude F. Knight; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-XCHQ-NMX : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication M623, roll 822. Gertrude’s cemetery marker provides only a birth year. See Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84780497, Gertrude Edwards (1885-1920), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death years.


11 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079411, James P. Knight (20 May 1888-24 May 1913), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photographs by Lionel Stegall support the birth and death years as well as his parents.


12 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 83652523, Charlie Emmett Knight (29 Aug 1892-1 Feb 1951), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.


13 1900 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 258A (stamped), dwell. & fam. 29, Joseph W. Knight family.


14 1900 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 258A (stamped), dwell. & fam. 29, line 41, Julia Knight.


15 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Mississippi, population schedule, Boyds Precinct, SD 1, ED 124, p. 75A (stamped), dwelling 32, family 34, line 7, Julia A. Knight; digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MPDC-VFH : accessed 9 Aug 2016); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 752.


16 Find A Grave, memorial no. 84079111, William Knight (4 Jun 1852-9 Feb 1909), Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi.


17 1910 U.S. census, Monroe Co., Miss., pop. sch., p. 75A (stamped), dwell.. 32, fam. 34, Julia A. Knight household.


18 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 83652571, Flora Bell Worthy Knight (1893-1 Sep 1915), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Monroe County, Mississippi. The accompany photograph by Lionel Stegall shows her name as Florabell, but it supports the birth year and death date as transcribed as well as her status as Emmet’s wife.


19 Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 Aug 2016), memorial no. 84079353, Julia A Knight (10 May 1851-21 May 1916), created by Peggy Hill; citing Liberty Cemetery, Itawamba County, Mississippi. The accompanying photograph by Lionel Stegall supports the birth and death dates.

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